Why are 10-pin DIP integrated circuits so uncommon?

There are many 8 pin PDIPs 14 pin PDIPs flood the logic gate listings, but 10 and 12 are apparently pariahs. Why are 10-pin DIPs so uncommon?

While today’s computer-assisted manufacturing would make it relatively inexpensive to create and manufacture new styles of lead frames, tooling used to be much more complicated and expensive, and there were relatively few discrete sizes of chips.

As chip production increased, manufacturers may have had to produce new tools simply to keep up with demand. If one has four punches to produce DIP14 lead frames, one can only produce four such lead frames at a time. However, they would have had more inclination to add tools for sizes that were slightly larger than existing ones than for sizes that were smaller. Thus, they could offer chips that could do things previously not possible.

The only real use for a 10-12 pin DIP would have been for an application where an 8-pin chip would have been insufficient, but a 14-pin part would have been too big. Even before the invention of surface-mount technology, there weren’t many such applications. Once surface-mount technology came on the scene, there really weren’t any. Someone, who needed a chip with 9-12 useful connections but couldn’t afford the size of a 14-pin DIP, wouldn’t use a 10-12 pin DIP. They’d use a surface-mount part instead.

Read More: A Beginner’s Guide to SMD Components

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Oliver Smith

Oliver Smith

Oliver is an experienced electronics engineer skilled in PCB design, analog circuits, embedded systems, and prototyping. His deep knowledge spans schematic capture, firmware coding, simulation, layout, testing, and troubleshooting. Oliver excels at taking projects from concept to mass production using his electrical design talents and mechanical aptitude.
Oliver Smith

Oliver Smith

Oliver is an experienced electronics engineer skilled in PCB design, analog circuits, embedded systems, and prototyping. His deep knowledge spans schematic capture, firmware coding, simulation, layout, testing, and troubleshooting. Oliver excels at taking projects from concept to mass production using his electrical design talents and mechanical aptitude.

What Others Are Asking

Is there any licensing restrictions of PCB components?

Let’s say I plan on building a consumer electronic system, which would have a PCB and a plethora of various components,such as LEDs, transistors, resistors, etc. I would purchase these from a distributor or perhaps even directly from a manufacturer. Do I also owe royalties or other licensing-based fees for each of these components? What criteria/factors drive this answer?

Why aren’t components in DIP package shipped with straight pins?

I’ve noticed that all DIP packaged devices have pins which are at an angle other than 90∘ and need to be bent so that the angle is right for insertion into holes on the PCB or wherever. Is there any reason other than tradition for that? 

Are SMT components bad for high voltage applications?

Many assembly factories are asking for SMT jobs, while I think through hole would be a better option for a high voltage application. Before the high voltage project is started, we need to make a call on SMT or Through hole parts. Is there a study on this?

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